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  1. Somewhere between now and January, I've become a lot more aware of things that I seem to neglect in my life...books being one of them. I love reading, however, I never followed through with that.

    Recommend unto me some deliciously awesome books, because I'm thirsty for some moist, juicy literature.

    EDIT: FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF!!!!

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  3. This guy.

    Orwell's 1984.

    My quasi-religious text.

    Dripping wet with literary goodness. Oh yeah, there's some sex in there, too.

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  4. Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard...

    [quick note: yes that was a joke...just wanted to make sure we were all clear on that]

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  5. Tales of Pain and Wonder - Caitlin R. Kiernan
    The Five of Cups - Caitlin R. Kiernan
    Threshold - Caitlin R. Kiernan
    Low Red Moon - Caitlin R. Kiernan

    (Yes, she happens to be my favourite author)

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  6. seriously though, I recieved 'Myst: The Book of Atrus' by Rand Miller as a gift and decided to crack it open for the hell of it...for a book taking place in the desert, it's REALLY good :)

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  7. ok... no one else here will want to read it buuuttt I absolutely loved this book http://www.annesoffee.com/aboutbook.php snake hips
    by anne soffee

    btw LC I'm totally gonna stalk you now on myspace buuuwahhh hahahaha

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  8. The Princess Bride... You've all seen the movie, now read the damned BOOK!!!

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  9. Musashi - Eiji Yoshikawa. Fantastic read.

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  10. Gunter Grass, Melville, and Milan Kundera happen to be my favorite authors.
    Check out Tad Williams for a good long, obsessive read. Caitlin R. Kiernan has prose by the neck and books like Gravity's Rainbow, Don Quixote, Lucky Jim, the Invisible Man. Before: The Tin Drum, anything Tolkien, Thomas Pynchon, RA Salvatore, Victor Hugo, James Clavell, Angela's Ashes, uh, lots of stuff.

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  12. Read VALIS by Phillip K Dick

    but otherwise, just stuff like on the road (kerouac), catcher in the rye, Kurt Vonnegut, grahame greene (brighton rock being the obvious starting point), fear and loathing in las vegas, douglas adams and all his hitchikers guide stuff.

    plays are sometimes a bit shit to read, but if you like them then under wilk wood by dylan thomas is good,

    The Man in the High Castle by phillip K Dick

    if i knew some more obscure stuff i'd try to impress you with that, but i dont really know anything which isnt a "penguin classic"

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  13. The Andromeda Strain, Airframe, A Case of Need, and Sphere by Michael Crichton. Heck, just get anything by him.

    Oh, and for hilarity, try A Semester In The Life of a Garbage Bag by Gordon Korman. Too. Much. Funny.

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  14. I just began reading Memoirs of a Geisha the movie was so good...

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  15. Memoirs of a Geisha was a hilarious movie, hiring an almost entirely Chinese cast to play Japanese people and doing hardly any research into Japanese culture, I just couldn't stop laughing at how unauthentic it was. My sister and her boyfriend borrowed the DVD and were watching it so I decided to jump in and watch it as well. We spent the entire time picking out the decripencies in the movie, 'wait... that's chinese,' 'that's also chinese,' 'they tried but that is still chinese.' The whole movie was like 90% chinese, the only thing stopping us from thinking it was supposed to be chinese was the surroundings. A more proper title for the movie would have been "Memoirs of a Chinese Geisha."

    And about books, I just read a book called, "The Kite Runner" by Khalied Hosseini for school and it is pretty damn good.

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  16. The book (Memoirs of a Geisha) was written by an American. It's a tad unfair to go nuts at the 'lack of research' when it's clearly a Hollywood film not trying to be ultra realistic.

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  17. yeah I heard the movie strayed from the book a bit, well regardless of all the descrepincies... I still really liked the movie.

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  18. Hustler

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  19. Its ok Xavi, you can, you know, participate and actually contribute something of worth to this discussion. :)

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  20. Truman Capote's short stories are great...'In Cold Blood' isn't bad either :)

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  21. Neil Gaiman.
    Dickens.
    E.E.Cumings.

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  22. I just read the 'Brokeback Mountain' short story last night. it's really just a wonderful story.

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  23. Is that the one you wrote or the official one? 'Cause, you know...

    • coughyaoifangrrrlcoughhack*
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  24. hahaha no it's the real one by annie proulx

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  25. revolution in the head by ian macdonald, because everyone loves the beatles

    its a review of every beatles song ever recorded, literally everything they ever did, its the perfect book

    i like the beatles

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  26. I don't like the beatles.

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  27. Well it all depends on what your preference is.

    I am quite a large fan of satire and I love most of the novels written by Kurt Vonnegut Jr, such as:

    -Breakfast of Champions
    -The Sirens of Titan
    -Cat's Cradle
    -Slaughter-House Five

    and my personal favorite: Bluebeard

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    • steals everyone's book lists* Going to the Book Barn this Friday, stock up at $1 a book! I have $60 in credit which I can only use as a discount.
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  28. I also recently picked up Dan Brown's 'Deception Point' I havent read it yet so I dont know if it'll be good or not. I loved the Da Vinci code, but it was exactly the same as his other book so I'm kind of thinking this one might be the same too... judging by what it says on the back. I'll let everyone know.

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  29. Hmm I never was much of a fan of the Da Vinci Code...

    His endings always seem to ruin the book for me. I'm not going to ruin anything for you people but I just absolutely hate how Dan Brown ends his books.

    Tom Robbin's books aren't that bad, although I'm still chugging my way through Skinny Legs and All

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  30. the only thing that bothers me about him is that the two books I read from him (Da Vinci Code and Angels and Deamons) were the same exact book. I think Da Vinci code was a better version of the first one.

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  31. This is because Dan Brown is (sorry!) AN AWFUL SUBPAR PSUEDO-PULP-MYSTERY WRITER.
    Now, a man that can write about how a bunch of feminists put a talking flounder on trial, and tie in culinary history with the history of man's fight against the matriarchy... THAT'S A WRITER.

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  32. Bob said:
    I don't like the beatles.

    then you do not like music

    sorry

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  33. Haha, as the worker at the local Book Coral (a used book store) said, "we carry mostly junk fiction -- from the da vinci code to anne rice novels and romance novels as well"

    clearly the dingy fifty year old man knows his stock.

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  34. Oh, I LOVE music. Just not boy-bands, for some reason.
    Billie Holiday, Ani DiFranco, Sleater-Kinney, the Shins, more anti-facist hiphop than you could count, just saw soulfly last night, going to see Ben Harper, Beck, the Decemberists, Deerhoof, and the FLAMING LIPS(AIIIEEE!!!) in may, and in June I'm amped to see Hank III for the first time. I can dig John Lennon's solo stuff, but all the other stuff is too bland, or the people they took the stylings from is so much more better; Ravi Shankar, the blues style(which I realize is there own stylings, and as the UK had a tendacy to treat black blues artists a lot better than the good ol' Racist of A)...

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  35. ewwww Vonnegut

    I don't get fiction.

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  36. Urhm. Explain Matt!

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  37. i don't get fiction, as in i think it sucks. i was just trying to put it nicely but you fucked that up for me didn't you Bob???

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  38. Bob said:
    Oh, I LOVE music. Just not boy-bands, for some reason.
    Billie Holiday, Ani DiFranco, Sleater-Kinney, the Shins, more anti-facist hiphop than you could count, just saw soulfly last night, going to see Ben Harper, Beck, the Decemberists, Deerhoof, and the FLAMING LIPS(AIIIEEE!!!) in may, and in June I'm amped to see Hank III for the first time. I can dig John Lennon's solo stuff, but all the other stuff is too bland, or the people they took the stylings from is so much more better; Ravi Shankar, the blues style(which I realize is there own stylings, and as the UK had a tendacy to treat black blues artists a lot better than the good ol' Racist of A)...

    THE BEATLES!

    again, sorry

    and ravi shankar was a tad awful

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  39. Nice is for nancy-boys!!!
    And Ravi Shankar(and his GORGEOUS daughter) is like honey for my ears.

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  40. i thought you didnt like bland music?

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  41. yes yes you are so SMRT. Ravi Shankar is bomb-World music is bomb. Saturday I get to go see fire-dancers, gyspy-music straight outta Romania(SUNT PARICOLOCOS!) with belly-dancers OMMMFFFFFFGGGGGG. So hawt.

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  42. Bob said:
    yes yes you are so SMRT. Ravi Shankar is bomb-World music is bomb. Saturday I get to go see fire-dancers, gyspy-music straight outta Romania(SUNT PARICOLOCOS!) with belly-dancers OMMMFFFFFFGGGGGG. So hawt.

    I LOVE firedancers fumes with jealousy I'm friends with a girl in vegas who does firedancing and I'm dying to learn. knowing me I'd do something harmful with it though O_o

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  43. i meant norah jones, shes alright, but you cant say shes not bland. shes bland as fuck.

    simon reynolds- rip it up and start again.

    (its not fiction!)

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  44. Who said anything about Norah Jones except you?

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  45. Norah Jones has done some great shit, mang! But you don't get to know, ha HA!
    Yeah, onnuva my oldest friends does firedancing, he's gonna be teaching my crew; he lives with onnuva my best friends, Trella.
    lasf.fm is proverbially the SHIT, by the way. Thanx primigenus!

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  46. Paul said:
    Who said anything about Norah Jones except you?

    ravi shankars daughter

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  47. I did firedancing in my friend's backyard once, apparently I'm quite good, but i've been randomly twirling all kinds of sticks for years (drumsticks, broomhandles, random metal poles etc...out of habit), all I did was light the ends on fire haha...

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  48. BOOKS.

    SUGGEST FUCKING BOOKS.

    I DON'T WANT YOU GUYS TO FUCK THIS TOPIC UP. TALK ABOUT FUCKING BOOKS.

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  49. bob dylan- chronicles

    its bob dylan, what more do you need

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  50. Steve said:
    BOOKS.

    SUGGEST FUCKING BOOKS.

    I DON'T WANT YOU GUYS TO FUCK THIS TOPIC UP. TALK ABOUT FUCKING BOOKS.

    books on firedancing!?!?!?!

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  51. HEH!
    OK books, then.
    I suggest reading GUNTER GRASS. READ GUNTER GRASS. YOU WILL NOT REGRET!!!
    THIEVES AND KINGS
    SHARKNIFE
    SCOTT PILGRIM
    FLCL
    WWW.STUFFSUCKS.COM
    WWW.BARTLEBY.COM

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  52. Btw, I'm currently reading A WIZARD OF EARTHSEA at the behest of my lovely girlfriend. Otherwise I'd probably be hauling ass through Agile Web Development with Ruby on Rails at this point in time!

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  53. Viajera said:
    Damn you, Matt. Damn you and your Vonnegut-hating self. Who could hate something like Tramalfedorians?

    Well, I suggest Vonnegut.
    Read the Grimms' Fairy Tales. It's creepy just how different those are from the glamoured kiddy versions. Example: with Cinderella's step-sisters, one had her eyes pecked out by a crow and the other had her feet cut off, both as punishment. Hahaha. I loves it.

    I thought the step sisters and step mother get raped?! am I just wrong or do they get raped? (it always seemed like justice to me!)

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  54. hahaha who cares about the noobs we need to break them in one way or another don't we?! natural selection must take its course, who can survive us who cannot.....

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  55. I was waiting at Safeway for my friends to finish with some RX stuff, and I read the first page and stopped. Waste, what a waste. So I went and harassed the sushi chef in Japanese.

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  56. Ahh... the Da Vinci Code... the result of centuries of ingrained, deep setted religion coming against a confrontional text in a age where spirituality is gone and pragmatism rules. In fact it isn't that great a book. I only found it good for a bit of a laugh and that's all. The only reason it is so popular is because of the general vulgarness of the masses

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  57. the Da Vinci Code is essentially Final Fantasy X in book form. So if you bash the one and like the other, you're a dirty hypocrite -- shut the fuck up. If you hate both, then great, you aren't easily bowled over by airport-novella storylines around fantastical organisations hell-bent on preserving power throughout the ages. If you like both, well, then you're apparently into reading between the lines and finding the less-obvious tones of a story.

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  58. It's a good read, but not that great of a book.

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  59. the Da Vinci code is entertaining, people take things too seriously I think. I suppose someone studying history or something would get pissed off because of inaccuracies. but what the hell do I know?! right! so I found it good.

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  60. Can we talk about a different book yet? How about Franz Kafka's "The Penal Colony"? Anybody read it? Enjoy it? LOVE IT?

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  61. Too much Colony, not enough Penal.

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  62. Rachel meant to say "too much colony, not enough penis", methinks.

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  63. Yer making me cry.

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  64. Portrait of a Lady!:D

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  65. Also,

    Engines of Creation, Eric Drexler
    The Singularity is Near, Ray Kurzweil

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  66. Two more series for you guys to consider... First off, from the writer of the "Sword of Shinarra (or however you spell it)... we have....

    Terry Brooks-
    The Magic Kingdom of Landover
    · Magic Kingdom For Sale -- Sold!
    · The Black Unicorn
    · Wizard At Large
    · The Tangle Box
    · Witches' Brew

    And, one of my favorite since I was a kid... we have the Hugo and Nebula award winning writer....

    Orson Scott Card-
    Ender's Game Series
    Ender's Game
    Speaker for the Dead
    Xenocide
    Children of the Mind

    _I just learned about the whole other side to the "Ender's Game" series... four other books using "Ender's Game" as a stepping stone... crap... looks like I"m going to teh bookstore again...

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  67. hmm. mostly anything by Michael Crichton is a bestseller. I've read three of his books and their pretty damn good. Also try reading anything by Mitch Albom. The Five People You Meet In Heaven and Tuesdays With Morrie are really good books by him. really sad though. The Perks Of Being A Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky is a kickass book. short but awesome. Good luck with choosing btw. ahah :D

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  68. Books? I like Harry Potter/

    and the face book

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  69. THREAD REVIVAL!

    I just read confessions of an Economic Hitman by John Perkins...that's a good read if you can stomach nonfiction.

    What has everyone else been reading?

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  70. I have been trying to finish Blood Meridian for months. It's so hard to read for pleasure when you have so much else to read =

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  71. "Maps and Legends" by Michael Chabon, "Icelander" by Dustin Long, "The Illustrated Man" by Ray Bradbury, "The Corrections" by Jonathan Franzen, "Necromancer" by William Gibson, and "Dune" by Frank Herbert.

    I've been combing through the sci-fi section at my local used books store looking for stuff mainly because it's a genre I'm completely unfamiliar with and I don't know what to look for.

    If you're looking for good, interesting short stories pick up some of the Mcsweeney's quarterlies.

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  72. Dune is my favorite book ever.

    Right now I'm reading Steel Egg by John Shirley, which is set in the Aliens universe.

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  73. From what I have read of Dune, it is superb. Unfortunately it suffers from being just over 500 pages long. For this reason it will surely remain a work in progress for me, probably for the next 2-3 years, despite its awesomeness.

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  74. Trust me, once you start it will be hard to put down; it's just that awesome.

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  75. If you guys have any other sci-fi suggestions, I'd like to hear them. I've heard good stuff about Ringworld and I'm trying to find a copy of Rendezvous with Rama. I'm starting to think that there weren't any good sci-fi books written after the '70s.

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  77. Well, let's see, good sci-fi books post-70s...

    the Timothy Zahn Star Wars trilogy (Heir to the Empire, Dark Force Rising, and The Last Command) is deliciously excellent (and I'm not even much of a Star Wars fan)

    On a similar run, the Steve Perry Aliens trilogy (Earth Hive, Nightmare Asylum, and The Female War) is a bit more horror than sci-fi, but still some fantastic reads.

    The Postman by David Brin is great. Just do yourself a favor and don't bother with the movie.

    I can probably post more later, when I get home and can take a look at my books.

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  78. Mr_Domino said:
    Well, let's see, good sci-fi books post-70s... the Timothy Zahn Star Wars trilogy (Heir to the Empire, Dark Force Rising, and The Last Command) is deliciously excellent (and I'm not even much of a Star Wars fan)

    This.

    Also, finish Dune. The ending is fucking awesome.

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  79. I don't think I can read The Postman. It would bring back too many horrible memories.

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  80. I've almost finished the third Dune book but I felt like I needed a break from the political drama so I picked up the Bantam reprints of 7 early "The Shadow" novels from the 30s. It's easy to see why these books have been such huge influence on so many writers (Alan Moore, Frank Miller, Mike Mignola, etc.), the stories themselves don't seem dated at all and they are awesome. If you're into the noir-pulp genre, these are must reads.

    The Shadow's character in the books is almost the complete opposite of how we typically address our costumed heroes nowadays. He has no backstory, the books aren't from his perspective but from the people he employs and his enemies, and unlike Batman, he's not reluctant to pop a cap in someone's ass.

    Reading the books is like reading the screenplay for the most awesome action-mystery movie ever made. I highly recommend them.

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  81. Dean said:
    Bantam reprints of 7 early "The Shadow" novels from the 30s.

    This is relevant to my interests....any suggestions on which book to start on (or are just plain awesome)?

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  82. I only have 6 of the 7 Bantam reprints and the one I'm missing is the first one. I've almost finished "The Death Tower " but I'm not sure where this one goes in the order.

    The books I have are:

    The Eyes of the Shadow
    The Death Tower
    Gangdom's Doom
    The Shadow Laughs!
    Hidden Death
    The Ghost Makers

    I'm missing "The Living Shadow."

    Since these were the ones Bantam chose to reprint, I'm assuming that they are some of the better ones.

    Here is a list of the novels.

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  83. I'm probably a little late to declare how awesome "Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell" is. I just picked it up a couple of weeks ago and I have to say that it's one of the best books I think I've ever read. If you're into the alternate timeline genre and are at all interested in the Napoleonic Wars combined with magic, check it out. It's completely worthy of the almost universal praise its received.

    They're apparently going to make it into a movie, but I can't believe that such a thing can even be attempted.

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  84. I've enjoyed Lucky Wander Boy very much recently. I went out and bought a second copy just to have a loaner. Some people have argued against its treatises on video gaming, and some people were confused by the ending, but I was neither of those, and I loved it.

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  85. Hey it is that time of year again. School is out, that means I can actually read books books again. I have some ideas of what I may try, but I wanted some additional input. I have a poor attention span with books. If it is over 300 there is a good chance I won't finish it, even if it is great (200 pages I can usually do). I like sci fi and biting social commentary.

    Some books I like:
    The Sirens of Titan (Kurt Vonnegut Jr.)
    Ender's Game (Orson Scott Card)
    The Rules of Attraction (Bret Easton Ellis)
    The Elementary Particles (Michel Houellebecq)
    Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury)
    The Thief of Always (Clive Barker)

    Some books I am considering:
    Snow Crash
    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
    Minority Report
    The Lady Tasting Tea

    Any other recommendations would be cool too.

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  86. Planet of the Apes - Pierre Boulle
    The Postman - David Brin (Long, but somewhat episodic, so you could read some, then come back to it later on)
    Starship Troopers - Robert Heinlein
    Job: A Comedy of Justice - Robert Heinlein (longish, but oh so funny)

    And definitely read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Also, assuming you're familiar with Blade Runner, there are two novels by K.W. Jeter (a friend of Dick) that are sequels to both DADoES? and Blade Runner, tying the two interpretations together, and continuing the plotline even further into the rabbit hole. They're quite good.

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  87. If you're into P K Dick, I would advise hunting down "The Man In The High Castle" its suppose to be his best book though it is incredibly overlooked just because it hasn't been made into a movie.

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  88. OK so after a month and a half of having the 250 page book, I have finished Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

    I enjoyed it thoroughly. If I hadn't been so exhausted by work I would have finished it much sooner than now. It was a little slow to start, but the last half of the book really sped by.

    I have some questions/comments about the end if anyone would care to enlighten me with their opinion:


    At the end with all the Mercer stuff that went on, I did not understand one bit. Decker starts hallucinating or something about Mercer. Why? I have no clue. What purpose it serves? I'd really like to know. Since it's there for a good reason I imagine. Even how all the Mercer stuff works after it was revealed to be a sham doesn't make sense. Or was the sham a sham?

    I picked up Ubik and The Man in High Castle at the library today. If both of them are as good as Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? I'll probably be adding Dick to my favorite authors list (Currently consisting of Vonnegut, McCarthy, and Bradbury)

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  89. Well, Nels, I told you to check out DADoES? a bit too early. Boom studios just put out the first issue of a comic adaptation of the book using the complete, unabridged text of the novel, but adding pictures and word bubbles essentially. It was interesting, and I'm definitely going to be picking up all the issues. In addition, each issue has a bit of backmatter by a contemporary author or artist, the first issue having stuff from Warren Ellis.

    Reading the S.M. Sterling Terminator trilogy at the moment. (Infiltrator atm, then Rising Storm, and The Future War)

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  90. I'll check it out if I see it at the comic book shop while getting my copies of Deadpool and The Unwritten.

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  91. Deadpool is good again? I stopped reading it after Ed Mcguinness left the book, which was like a million years ago.

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  92. Well, he had this stint where he was rooming with Cable that a lot of people seemed to like. Now Cable's off being sullen again, and Deadpool has a new series. Evidently people shoot at him occasionally. I wouldn't really know.

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  93. I laugh at my previous posts. you guys might enjoy Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth series... 12 books full of rape and violence and red leather clad chicks who use an electric dildo like device to torture their captives. LOVE IT oh its also what Legend of the Seeker is based off of. show's very different from the series though, no rape as of yet.

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  94. Alrighty, so I finally finished The Man in the High Castle. It was pretty good. It took about 200 of the 260 pages for things to start moving, but they sure did move. I am not a good critical thinker when it comes to analyzing what I read, but after reading a critical analysis of it (I enjoy skimming the cliffs notes after I reading the classics) I was happy to report I did pick up on some of it and was quite intrigued by the themes explored.

    Definitely recommended.

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  96. Man in the High Castle was a total loss for me. I'm very surprised that it's considered Dick best work. A lot of the characters seemed completely unimportant and their roles in the overall story were highly questionable. When I saw that it took place from multiple perspectives I was hoping that it was going to be like a William Gibson novel where the stories would intertwine and complete a larger narrative, but unfortunately this was not the case.

    Speaking of Gibson, I just finished Mona Lisa Overdrive. If you haven't read the "Sprawl Trilogy" (Neuromancer, Count Zero, MLO) do yourself a favor and check them out. I enjoyed the first two more than the third, not to say that MLO was bad, it just wasn't as good as the other two which are probably on the short list of the best books I've ever read.

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  97. I'm starting Stephani Perry's Resident Evil series. I'm a big Steve/Steph Perry fan, and a big fan of game novelizations (there's some surprisingly good ones), so I've always kinda wanted to read them, but I just wasn't into Resident Evil until recently. Now that I've been converted, I'm devouring the first one (should have it done by monday) and I'll be on the lookout for the others as I can find them.

    Also really excited to read the new Terminator book, Cold War. Been on a bit of a licensed book kick.

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  98. Dean,

    From what I gather, The Man in the High Castle is not really about what it is about. It is really about:


    The nature of reality. What is real, what isn't, and if anything is real at all. It isn't really about Nazi's or WW2 or what would have happened if the Nazi won. The alternate history is a fabrication that furthers the questioning of reality. To us it is false, but it the character it is true. However the characters in the novel are all reading a book where it is false.

    Also, the characters do intertwine, just very subtly. Also, I read recently that Dick believed his best work was A Scanner Darkly.

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  99. Yeah, I get that part. The motivations of a lot of the characters were just very vague. Juliana is a character that doesn't care at all about the conflict or have any stake in anything, yet she goes through this miraculous transformation within a day or so that makes her determined to save this author of this book she just read. Tagomi and Childan have the roles of supporting characters yet we're following them mostly. You could probably consider them the main characters of the book yet neither of them impact the storyline in any meaningful way. The only thing Dick really gets through with them is a comment on cultural authenticity. The Young Japanese couple and Frank were just dead end characters that had far too much time put into them that didn't develop into anything. The universal use of the I Ching (which seems strangely out of place in a Japanese dominated society) was overdone. If one character had relied on it then it would have made for an interesting plot device but since it's used by every character it took away a lot of the characterization (Juliana is suppose to be impulsive and reckless yet she carries the I Ching around with her?). Baynes was a lot of build up that amounted to nothing.

    I expected the book to be a means of control like it was in 1984. But it wasn't. So really when you think about it: the book, Juliana, and Abendsen have nothing to do with anything else that happens in the book. Dick just throws it out there and then the book ends. If he thought this was the theme of the novel, he should have committed more of the storyline to it and ended it in a way where this revelation brings about some sort of change in either the characters or the world in which they exsist. But it doesn't, it just stops. Quote from wiki: "In a 1976 interview, Dick said he planned to write a sequel novel to The Man in the High Castle: 'And so there's no real ending on it. I like to regard it as an open ending. It will segue into a sequel sometime.'" What in the hell was the sequel going to be? More antiquing and espionage plots that don't go anywhere?

    The book was just a letdown for me. It felt like the whole thing was just meaningless filler so that Dick could purpose this trippy concept in the end. And the concept wasn't even that original. cough..1984..cough

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  100. I'd tried to argue with you, but I've all ready returned to book to the library so I can't go back and reference it for a proper discussion (I have awful memory of just about everything I read so the reference is a must). I think you're wrong and I'll leave it at that.

    I can't recall the end to 1984. How is it similar?

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  101. I think how you view the book is pretty subjective. I just could identify with any of the characters or what they were doing.

    The ending of 1984 isn't similar at all, I meant the concept of writing a novel about an alternate history of post WWII. 1984 ends with O'Brien revealing that Goldstein and his book were inventions by the Party as a means of controlling the public. The use of the book in both novels is very similar.

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  102. I think how you view the book is pretty subjective

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  103. Yay double post. So finally after three years of working on it I finished Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy. This is the third book I've read by him and I really enjoyed it. I'm still interested in reading The Road and Suttree. The Road is pretty darn difficult to get from the library since it's so popular. Suttree is about 500 pages long, so I'm going to have to hold off on that one till I finish one of my other long term reading projects.

    Which brings me to Dune, one of my long term projects. I've finally picked it up again and I blazed through another 90 pages in the last few days. I just finished the end of the first part of the book. Hopefully with all the time I'll be spending on a plane at the end of this month I'll have plenty of time to finish it up. This is exciting for me because it will become the longest book I've ever read (besides a textbook) by quite a large margin.

    I haven't quite made up my mind about what I want to move onto next after Dune, though I'm keeping the recommendations I've all ready received in this thread in mind.

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  104. @Nels - I should probably read Blood Meridian. One of my favorite albums is "Hex; Or Printing in the Infernal Method" by Earth, which supposedly has heavy influence from that book. In fact, so much so that a friend of mine listened to that album long after reading the book and came to the conclusion that both were somehow related.

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  105. @Nels

    I really need to read Dune again. Every few years, I have to pick it up again, its just that awesome.

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  106. @Mr_Domino So I finally finished it about 30 minutes ago. It took my just short of 3 years to finish, but it really was amazing. What's disappointing to me is that this book highlights a very big issue I have with reading. It is literally one of the most engaging books I have ever read. Fascinating, enthralling, etc. But I could still only read it in spurts due to some complex I have about reading. Months would go by and I wouldn't read it at all for no other reason than I didn't feel like it, despite not being bored one bit by it. If it were a lesser book, I don't know if I would have ever gotten through all 489 pages (pocket-sized paperback). Now I'm going to go back and watch the movie. A friend and I started it back when we were in middle school but he got so bored we had to stop watching about halfway through. Time for me to finish it too!

    Next up for reading I should finish The Road. After that I'm not sure. I got a collection of short stories by Philip K. Dick and something by Mark Twain for Christmas. I used a gift card I got to buy Snow Crash. I don't think I really feel like any of those right now. Oh well, I guess we'll see.

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  107. All right, so I finished The Road a couple months back now. I started both Pudd'nhead Wilson by Mark Twain and Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson, but I've stopped on both. Sort of lost interest for the moment. Though I definitely still want to finish them later.

    I ended up reading Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro. It was pretty good, but for something that is supposed to be a love story it seemed way too much like everyone was mainly interested in sex. Also I was a little bummed by how much the sci-fi elements were almost completely unnecessary for the bulk of the story.

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  108. @Nels Is The Road the book that the movie was based on? That was the scariest, most depressing movie I've seen in a while.

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  109. @Matt Yeah it is. I've heard mixed things about the movie. Not sure if I should see it or not. What's your thought on the matter?

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  110. @Nels It was well done and worth watching, if very depressing. I can't imagine reading the book if the mood is similar. Tell me, is the book also vague about what caused the apocalypse?

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  111. @Matt It is vague. The story isn't about the apocalypse. It's about the man and the boy and how they live now that one has occurred. It's a detail people get hung-up on that is really of no consequence.

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  112. Currently I'm reading I, Lucifer by Glen Duncan. It's pretty entertaining, recommended.

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  113. Just picked up the first Hellboy Library Edition (Which is the first two books in an oversized hardcover) - truly bitchin' stuff. Despite growing up in a comic shop, I managed to completely miss these in my youth. God bless reprints.

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  114. All righty, I just finished Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson, a book recommended by several forum members. And yes, it was incredible. I definitely want to start reading Diamond Age sometime within the next year and a half now.

    I'm also working on Reaper Man by Terry Pratchet. I didn't really know where to begin with books by him so I avoided him for a while. Then I was riding the bus one day when a really attractive woman was reading Reaper Man. I asked her about it. She recommended starting with Mort, so I'll probably read that soon. Apparently she finished Reaper Man right there on the bus after I finished asking questions, so she gave it to me. Hence, my reading it. It's pretty good. I haven't read that much fantasy/sci-fi books that are meant to be comedic. I think I prefer the more serious stuff, but it's still good.

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  115. @Nels

    I never could get into Pratchett. I tried, several times, but I just never got it. For comedic sci-fi/fantasy, Adams has always been my drug of choice. I'll read back through the entire Hithchiker's Guide series before I touch anything by Pratchett...or Anthony, for that matter.

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  116. @Mr_Domino I still haven't gotten around to the Hitchhiker books. I've been urged by so many people to do so any everything I've heard about them makes them sound great. Reaper Man is mildly amusing, but I was expecting a bit more out of it. It's good enough to finish and I'm going to try and do that soon simply so I can start working on other projects.

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  117. Moar doublepost time. After finishing Snow Crash a while back I had a hard time finding my next read. I still haven't finished Reaper Man and I see that staying on hold for a while. I had a hard time deciding what to read since I seemed to be left only with book on the order of 500 pages long and I just didn't feel up to it. So I went to the library and looked at Philip K. Dick's stuff again and found that Ubik is only 200 pages. I had checked this out a couple years ago but never even read the first page, so I figured, why not? Well, due to a recall request shortly after checking it out I blazed through it over the Thanksgiving holiday. I liked it, but it is really weird. At first I thought man, this would make an amazing movie. But the farther I got into it the harder it was to imagine it at a movie that wouldn't piss the whole audience off for being so strange and nonsensical. Don't get me wrong, it makes sense enough in the end (until the very last sentence), but I could see people scratching their heads going, What did I just watch?

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    • Thu November 26, 2020
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